“Social Art For Change” Reception

Social Art For Change

Join us on April 1st 2016, for our reception of “Social Art For Change” only at Highlands MotA.

Beatrize Mejia-Krumbein.

Exhibiting April 1-June 28, 2016

Social Art For Change speaks of multicultural and cross-cultural issues.  The artwork of Beatriz Mejia-Krumbein, a diverse media exhibit, addresses a range of 2015-BMKsocial concerns that includes violence against women and children and the cultural displacement and fragmentation experienced by persons torn from their community or country.  Her artwork objectifies the experience of people who are shattered but heroically hold their lives together.  Mejia-Krumbein was born and raised in Colombia, then lived in Germany, Mexico and the United States.  Her artwork has been widely exhibited in the United States, Europe, and South America and is in the permanent collection of many museums including the Los Angeles County Museum, The Museum of American Art of the Smithsonian Institute and many more.  This exhibit at MoTA will be an official introduction of Mejia-Krumbein to Highlands County, a new resident, as a highly talented artist bringing her enthusiasm for arts and culture to Highlands County.

Artist Brief Biography:  “I was raised in Colombia South America, and later living in Germany, Mexico and the United States.  I studied art and music in Colombia, and received a MFA from James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.

My life path lead me into experiencing different cultures; living in Colombia, Germany, Mexico and the United States. While encountering new people, places, and beliefs, my Weltanschauung was enriched. I understand that the most valuable knowledge I was granted is the conviction that all humans are equal and experience the same needs and feelings. We share experiences that transcend the world of forms, color, gender country of origin, or religion.

My Work addresses a range of social concerns, and using diverse media speaks about multicultural and cross-cultural issues. These concerns include violence against women and children, and the cultural displacement and fragmentation experienced by persons torn from their community or country.”