Image by Patrick Tomasso

featured artist

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You are formally invited to the solo showing of artist Colin Sutphin. Displaying 70 years of work at the Museum of the Arts.

Gallery Opening:

:: Museum of the Arts ::
351 W Center Ave.
Sebring, Fl 

July 24, 2022
3p-5p



Come and celebrate "70 years of Art". Drinks, snacks, and great conversation with our featured artist.

We look forward to seeing you there!






 

about the artist

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     "By 1948, while in elementary school, I had one particular teacher that encouraged me and gave me the freedom to draw most whatever I liked. In high school, another teacher was instrumental to my art advancement.

     While I was in the military, the other GIs would pay me to draw portraits of their girlfriends or moms. I picked up a few needed extra bucks that way.

     During my time in the Quartermaster, civilians working for the Army, they found out about my art ability. They had my assignment changed so I could join them and illustrate the new office machine manuals going to worldwide publication, circa 1964.

     By the 1970s, my wife and I, both artists, were active in the summertime sidewalk art shows. I worked for various companies as a draftsman or illustrator. Then, working for myself as a landscaper, drawing plans for customers and installing it afterwards.

     Formal education came, somewhat, from a semester at a fine arts college and several courses at the Ohio State University in landscape design and agronomy.

     So, in my retirement during this millennium, I have rekindled my desire for just fine art. Now a days I’m into mostly dry media. Pastels, pencils, and some pen.

     Now as an octogenarian, most of my waking hours are spent at the drawing board.”

colin sutphin
"70 years of art"

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“Drawing has been a life-long desire for me. As a little tyke during World War II, my mother would give me paper and pencil. I’m sure that kept me busy sketching choo-choo trains, chickens, etc."